<div dir="ltr">Hi Russell<br><br>Thank you for your response,  <br><br>To address your points:<br><br>>"Interesting project; though the issue can't be fixed by writing new laws as it requires consumers to switch to companies that promote good practices. "<br><br>While we can and should campaign to get people to support organisations, who are doing good work, or moving in that direction, we also must stop those who are not willing to change.  That can be done several ways, such as highlighting through consumer action, or by campaigning for legislative and regulatory change which addresses the problem at the source.<br><br>While consumer action can give people some control over the process this control is elusory, for example if you want to purchase a TV which respects your freedom, and right to repair it when it brakes, there is no such product.  <br><br>The consumer verses regulatory argument is an old one in the green movement, and they are not mutually exclusive.  However, I think that we have a much better chance of winning some of what we want, by building a movement, which advocates both for the right to repair and the right to have our freedom respected.<br><br>>"In that light, it's interesting you promote Google (as I am doing here too, a little), Facebook, and zoom, etc."<br><br>I agree with the Respects Your Freedom, however unfortunately we find ourselves in the position, where many of the people we want to reach with this are on Facebook or using software which does not respect freedom.<br><br>I have no objection to using another platform to stream the meeting, if you know of one which is reliable, and can be used by people who are not very computer literate.<br><br>>"So, a more logical standpoint would be to approach from a FSF (free software) perspective." <br><br>I agree with you totally on this, essentially, I would like to see done for hardware, what the free software foundation is doing for software.<br><br>>"So, whilst it might be possible to" write a new law, it'll be heavily disputed if it conflicts with owner’s intellectual property rights."<br><br>Well the question is which owner once you purchase a product, aren’t you the owner?  It goes without saying that there will be resistance to this, however nothing worth doing is easy.<br><br>>"Plus the effort involved in reverse engineering a device only to find it's been replaced, is not worth it, unless there's an effort to develop consumer products that aren't just use once and chuck away."<br><br>I agree with you on this, we want to look at designing products which are modular, and which can be repaired.   <br><br>Thank you for taking the time to respond to this message, your points are well made, I hope that you will be able to attend the meeting.  If not, could you please pass the email on to others who you think would be interested in this. <br><br><br><br></div><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr">On Tue, Jul 24, 2018 at 6:54 PM Russell N Hyer <<a href="mailto:hrothgar.ofstingan@gmail.com">hrothgar.ofstingan@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">Hi,<br>
<br>
Interesting project; though, in reality, the issue can't be fixed by<br>
writing new laws as it requires consumers to switch to companies that<br>
promote good practices. In that light, it's interesting you promote<br>
Google (as I am doing here too, a little), Facebook, and zoom, etc.<br>
So, a more logical standpoint would be to approach from a FSF (free<br>
software) perspective. Since, there's new hardware platforms (not so<br>
many at the moment) but they do exist and the certification to look<br>
for is RYF (respects your freedom). So, whilst it might be possible to<br>
write a new law, it'll be heavily disputed if it conflicts with owners<br>
intellectual property rights. Plus the effort involved in reverse<br>
engineering a device only to find it's been replaced, is not worth it,<br>
unless there's an effort to develop consumer products that aren't just<br>
use once and chuck away.<br>
<br>
You may have heard about the EOMA68 product, so run a search on<br>
duckduckgo and you'll see what I mean about what is possible (though<br>
there are other (not so many) similar products these days too).<br>
<br>
Best<br>
<br>
Russ<br>
<br>
On 24 July 2018 at 09:17, Right To Repair Ireland via tog<br>
<<a href="mailto:tog@lists.tog.ie" target="_blank">tog@lists.tog.ie</a>> wrote:<br>
> Initiatives such as the Repair Café, show that there is an appetite by the<br>
> public, to be able to repair their goods, rather than throw them away.<br>
><br>
><br>
> However, many companies are making it more difficult to repair, instead<br>
> manufacturing products which are designed to keep the user out:<br>
><br>
> Phone batteries can’t be removed<br>
><br>
> Car’s software can only be repaired by the dealer<br>
><br>
> MacBook keyboards can be laid low by a speck of dust<br>
><br>
> Schematic and repair manuals are restricted<br>
><br>
> Software source code is hidden<br>
><br>
><br>
><br>
> There is a growing movement around the planet for the right to repair. The<br>
> right to repair movement has sponsored legislation in 18 states of the<br>
> United States of America.<br>
><br>
><br>
><br>
> Strong right to repair legislation will contribute to:<br>
><br>
> An increase in the life of products<br>
><br>
> A reduction in the cost of repair<br>
><br>
> A reduction in waste<br>
><br>
> A reduction in the cost of products<br>
><br>
> A reduction in pollution<br>
><br>
><br>
> A Right to Repair Campaign meeting will take place on Wednesday 19th<br>
> September at 20:00 In the Teacher’s Club 36 Parnell Square West, Dublin 1<br>
><br>
> The aims of this campaign are:<br>
><br>
> 1. Write a right to repair bill<br>
><br>
> 2. Present it to TD’s and Senators<br>
><br>
> 3. Get it through the Houses of the Oireachtas<br>
><br>
> 4. Establish a culture of repair in Ireland<br>
><br>
><br>
><br>
> If you are interested in helping with this Please come along to the meeting,<br>
><br>
><br>
> Any suggestions for other groups, who would be interested in participating<br>
> in right to repair, would be welcome.<br>
><br>
><br>
><br>
> You can contact me on<br>
><br>
> Tel: +353(0)878289243,<br>
><br>
> Email <a href="mailto:righttorepairireland@gmail.com" target="_blank">righttorepairireland@gmail.com</a><br>
><br>
> Facebook: <a href="https://fb.me/RightToRepairIreland" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">https://fb.me/RightToRepairIreland</a><br>
><br>
> The details of the event can be found at<br>
> <a href="https://www.facebook.com/events/1707265585996039/" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">https://www.facebook.com/events/1707265585996039/</a><br>
><br>
> If you cant attend in person, you can Attend online at<br>
> <a href="https://zoom.us/j/4964640822" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">https://zoom.us/j/4964640822</a><br>
><br>
><br>
><br>
> _______________________________________________<br>
> tog mailing list<br>
> <a href="mailto:tog@lists.tog.ie" target="_blank">tog@lists.tog.ie</a><br>
> <a href="https://lists.tog.ie/mailman/listinfo/tog" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">https://lists.tog.ie/mailman/listinfo/tog</a><br>
> To unsubscribe from this list please visit:<br>
>  <a href="https://lists.tog.ie//mailman/listinfo/tog" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">https://lists.tog.ie//mailman/listinfo/tog</a><br>
</blockquote></div>